Integrated Master's in Europe

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Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Arabic and History of Art

Integrated Master's degree
Language: EnglishStudies in English
Subject area: languages
Qualification: MA
Kind of studies: full-time studies
University website: www.ed.ac.uk
Master of Arts (MA)
Arabic
Arabic (Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world. It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia in the east to the Anti-Lebanon mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic).
Art
Art is a diverse range of human activities in creating visual, auditory or performing artifacts (artworks), expressing the author's imaginative or technical skill, intended to be appreciated for their beauty or emotional power. In their most general form these activities include the production of works of art, the criticism of art, the study of the history of art, and the aesthetic dissemination of art.
History
History (from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation") is the study of the past as it is described in written documents. Events occurring before written record are considered prehistory. It is an umbrella term that relates to past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of information about these events. Scholars who write about history are called historians.
History
Man is a history-making creature who can neither repeat his past nor leave it behind.
W. H. Auden, The Dyers Hand, "D.H. Lawrence" (1962)
History
The greater part of what passes for diplomatic history is little more than the record of what one clerk said to another clerk.
G. M. Young, Victorian England: Portrait of an Age (1936)
History
Today is Yesterday's Pupil.
Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack (1751).

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